Senior Oration

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WCC 2020 graduate Parker Eidle giving his Senior Oration on Homer in February 2020.

The Senior Oration (also known as TRV 402) at Wyoming Catholic College is a thirty-minute oration followed by thirty minutes of questions and answers that all seniors at the school must complete. The Senior Oration, while not a verbatim memorization and reading of a student's Senior Thesis, which each completes the prior semester, has to be related to it in subject matter, and typically follows upon it quite closely. Together, the thesis and oration, a response, answer, or study on a significant question relevant to a topic a student's choice are the culminating work of their time at WCC, and are produced with frequent consultations with a chosen faculty member known as their Thesis Advisor. Senior Orations are open to the school community as well as the broader public and are typically held in mid to late February with all students given about three days off from classes in order to listen to and attend the senior's orations.

Panel[edit]

A panel of three professors, led by the student's thesis advisor, is present at each oration. They listen, evaluate, and then ask each orator questions pertaining to their oration, following upon which audience members are allowed to ask their own questions.

Audience[edit]

Sophomores taking rhetoric are typically required to attend as many orations as possible. No one else is required to attend, but since there are no other classes during the days in which orations are held, between twenty and fifty people usually attend each oration. Seniors produce one-page descriptions of their topic which are compiled into booklets for students to read and use in deciding which orations to attend. Due to the fact that every senior has to give an oration, and since the school doesn't want to take to much time off during the semester for orations, between two and three orations are typically held simultaneously, usually in separate rooms in the Augur Building, requiring students often to have to make tough choices as to which oration to attend at any one given time.